Stories

Stories through Photography

This exhibit highlights the power of photography in conveying a story. Photographers are invited to submit their stories to be juried for inclusion in an exhibition with Photojournalist Erik Castro and Fine Art Photographer John F. Martin July 22 – September 17, 2017 at Healdsburg Center for the Arts.
The exhibit will feature work that aligns with the idiom “a picture is worth a thousand words”. 

JURIED EXHIBIT

Photographers wishing to submit work for juried portion of the exhibit, please click here for the prospectus.

PHOTO CONTEST

A second component of this exhibition is a Photography Contest for Sonoma County Youth and Teens between the ages of 7 and 18 (not reaching 19th
birthday by August 30, 2017). The contest is sponsored by The LAB and The Weiss Family Art Scholarship Fund.
Youth/teens wishing to enter the Photography Contest, please click here for prospectus.

IMPORTANT DATES
Exhibition: July 22 thru September 17, 2017
Opening Reception: July 22, 2017 5:00 to 7:00 PM
Closing Tea: Sunday, September 17, 2017, 2:00 to 4:00 PM

JURORS:

PETER KROHN
Peter Krohn started with a Yashica twin lens camera and set-up a darkroom in a closet. For a few years he was a professional fashion photographer shooting exclusively with a Nikon F 2. In recent years, he creates fine art still life compositions with a flatbed scanner, and prints on aluminum, paper and canvas.

LazaR
Born in the Netherlands, LazaR developed his painting style while traveling, exhibiting and selling throughout Europe. He now lives in Sonoma County. I paint with my heart and my hands just follow. LazaR is the coordinator for Stories.

LEIGH WACHTER
My love of photography and film printing began as a child and I have pursued it as an art and a profession for the past 40 years. I photograph with both film and digital cameras and am drawn to images of landscapes, nature and portraiture, especially in an environment that resonates with the subject.

ROBERT WEISS, photographer, ceramic artist and past Board member of Healdsburg Center for the Arts. I have been involved in various forms of art all my life. For me, my art is an expression of what I personally enjoy. I got my first brownie camera when I was six and took pictures of everything. I still do today.

FEATURED ARTISTS

Erik Castro HARVESTER

Harvester_07In 2011 while on assignment for the San Francisco Chronicle, I photographed my first grape harvest; a night pick in Philo, California in the Anderson Valley. It was chaotic and I struggled to keep pace with the workers briskly cutting sticky grape clusters while filling plastic bins as fast as possible. A cloud of choking carbon monoxide wafted through the vineyard from truck engines and loud generators powering huge lights illuminating rows of grapes like a baseball field. That night stuck with me. I wanted to see those faces, but to me it was all a blur.

HARVESTER came from that experience. I wanted the public to see the faces of the people who traveled great distances—in this case all from Mexico–to toil at this labor-intensive job. In each image a Sonoma County harvest worker’s face is photographed the moment after he or she completes a harvest pick. The interaction I had with each harvest worker was intentionally brief much like street photography. It’s a purely visual story with each face its own personal narrative. 

 

 

 

John F Martin IN CHARACTER

character7a
IN CHARACTER was inspired by my experience with the SF opera. My introduction to opera was entirely by chance.  My wife read, in a newspaper column, that the San Francisco Opera was looking for men of my height and build for Carmen. I went to an audition, and before I knew it, I was a supernumerary in the opera. From the beginning, I was fascinated by what happens when people put on makeup and costumes. They become the character. And I became a character as well. 

From the start, I knew I wanted to set up a studio in the basement of the opera house. (Copyrighted costumes cannot leave the Opera House!) For five frustrating years I tried to get permission, without success. Finally, one day, I just showed up with all my gear and set up a studio in the basement of the opera house. I would either get thrown out or have the chance to get some wonderful portraits. I was first in and last out. I arrived at the opera two hours before curtain to set up and took down the set after the show. During a production I invited the talent to come down for their portrait. I never knew who was going to come down or when so I had to stay on the set during the entire performance and then worked very fast, because they were on their way to the stage. I was obsessed! Needless to say, I did not get thrown out, and six years and 32 operas later, I had a huge body of work. suitable for an art book. I put my heart and soul into this project and would not compromise the integrity of the book for just any publisher.  I was fortunate to have Mark Burstein as my agent and he found the perfect publisher, Amadeus Press.  This book is the culmination of all those years and was a life-changing experience. I loved every minute of it.

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